Reaper, McCormick Daisy ; McCormick Harvesting Machine Company; 1895

Name/Title

Reaper, McCormick Daisy

About this object

This is a McCormick Daisy Reaper, which pre-dates a binder. It was used to mow crop, leaving it in clumps to the side for hand tying. Those that walked behind the reaper to tie the crop developed a technique wherein they would tie the crop using a piece of the crop itself.

The Daisy is interesting in that it is part of an evolution of harvesting equipment. Harvesting equipment went through a number of stages of development from hand cutting with a sickle to the great combine harvesters that are manufactured today. The McCormick Daisy Reaper sits in the middle of this time and it is quite rear for one of these to have survived.

About the McCormick Daisy:

Known as the Queen of the Reapers, this model has two sickles which furnished each machine - a serrated sickle for grain and a smooth sickle for flax and other crops. Additionally, the seat was situated outside of the drive wheel to improve the traction and could be folded out of the way when passing through narrow gates.

Restored by Les Brown.

Maker

McCormick Harvesting Machine Company

Maker Role

Manufacturer

Date Made

1895

Period

1890s

Place Made

North and Central America, United States, Illinois, Cook County, Chicago

Medium and Materials

organic, vegetal, processed materials, wood.
inorganic, processed materials, metal, cast iron
inorganic, processed materials, metal, steel

Measurements

h 1185 mm x w 1340 mm x d 2480 mm

Subject and Association Keywords

Agriculture

Subject and Association Keywords

Machinery and Tools

Object Type

occupation-based equipment

Rights

All rights reserved

Tom Sullivan 08 Apr 2021 15:38 PM,UTC

Hello, i have just acquired a very similar machine. Having a bit of trouble understanding the mechanism for automatic sweeps.could you send me pictures of the spring set up
Tom 519 389 1907 Mount Forest On.

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