Pottery, Stoneware Water Filter; Cheavins; ?; RX.1978.46

Name/Title

Pottery, Stoneware Water Filter

About this object

Information copied from eHive entry at Whangarei Museum:

Large, leadless glazed stoneware charcoal water filter .

The filter system (missing) is inside the container. The stoneware container would be filled with charcoal, and water poured into the top of the receptacle. As the water passed through the charcoal it was cleansed. The clean water was drawn from the bottom of the container through the tap.

Charcoal is pure carbon, made from the partial burning of organic waste. It contains ions that help to kill germs, and it works on the principle of absorption. Large amounts of gases, including poisonous ones, and gases that create bad smells and tastes in water stick to the charcoal. It is porous, and has, therefore, large surface areas that absorb gas.

The Fulham Pottery was said to have been started by John Dwight (c1637-1703), first of the distinguished English potters, producer of works in stoneware. In 1889 the sale by auction of the premises of Fulham Pottery, Church St took place and the business became the property of the Fulham Pottery and Cheavin Filter Company Ltd.

During 1929 they were a listed exhibitor at the British Industries Fair, advertising as manufacturers of Cheavin's Filters and Filtering Cylinders for all domestic and industrial purposes.

Maker

Cheavins

Maker Role

Maker

Date Made

?

Period

unknown

Place Made

Europe, United Kingdom, England, London

Place Notes

None

Medium and Materials

processed material, ceramic, earthenware
processed material, metal

Inscription and Marks

LEADLESS GLAZE

Cheavin's
"SALUDOR"
(SAFE WATER)
FILTER

Drinking Water of
Absolute Purity

BRITISH MADE
THROUGHOUT

Measurements

Diam 215mm x h 560mm
wt 6350g

Subject and Association Keywords

Domestic Life (household chattels, food and drink)

Subject and Association Keywords

Local History

Object Type

containers

Object number

RX.1978.46

Copyright Licence  

All rights reserved

This object is from
Tags

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