Painting, 'Mood Venetian'; Faithful, Julia; 1983; ESC.88.001

Name/Title

Painting, 'Mood Venetian'

About this object

This artwork by Julia Faithful, painted sometime in the 1980s, is probably derived from sketches she made when travelling in Europe around the Adriatic Coast. During her lifetime, Julia built up a large body of work but is particularly celebrated for her watercolours.

Artist Biography:
Born in Dunedin, Julia Faithful (1933-2014) was the third, and youngest child, of Tex and Paddy Faithful, late of Otatara. She attended Gore High School before spending a final year at Southland Girls' High School.

One of Faithful’s early colleagues, Fay Cowie, who worked with her in H&J Smith's advertising department in 1949 recalled meeting Faithful when she was a school leaver looking for a job, “we saw that folder of work and knew she wouldn't be with us long."

Faithful trained as a Graphic Designer, working for other department stores, fashion houses and Christchurch newspaper The Press. On her return from overseas travel in the late 1960s she took over illustrating and editing the NZ Home Journal while also illustrating several books. She returned to Southland to tutor in painting at Southland Polytechnic in the late 1970s.

Much of her work is based on studies completed during painting trips to Britain and Europe, including travel on the Adriatic Coast and a later visit to Czechoslovakia which were influential.

Faithful was based in Southland, both Riverton and Invercargill, for the final thirty years of her life.

Maker

Faithful, Julia

Maker Role

Artist

Date Made

1983

Period

1980s

Medium and Materials

organic, vegetal, processed materials, wood
inorganic, processed materials, pigments, acrylic paints

Place Made

Oceania, New Zealand, South Island, Southland, Invercargill

Measurements

h 475 mm x w 612 mm x d 20 mm

Subject and Association Keywords

Art and Design

Object Type

artworks

Object number

ESC.88.001

Copyright Licence  

All rights reserved

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