The Auckland Ferry Building; Johnson, David, 1941-; 1988; 047300688X (pbk.); 201...

Name/Title

The Auckland Ferry Building

Maker

Johnson, David, 1941-

Maker Role

Author

Maker

Hobson Wharf (Auckland Maritime Museum)

About this object

"The Auckland Ferry Building sits astride Auckland's gateway from the sea, and is an Edwardian jewel in an increasingly utilitarian city of concrete and glass. This book celebrates the building's re-opening, after extensive refurbishing, in 1988. Illustrated by more than 70 photographs, it tells a story of waterfront politics, ferries, the coming of the Harbour Bridge, and the preservation of an Auckland architectural treasure"--Back cover. Contents: Auckland waterfront, 1905 -- Difficult decision -- At last it was built -- Tenants, clocks and ferries -- Railways and plumbing -- Twenties tenants, thirties chills, and the clock again -- Waiting for the bridge -- Dark days -- The return to favour. "First published in 1988 by Remarkable View Ltd for the Auckland Maritime Museum"--T.p. verso. Plans on inside covers.

Date Made

1988

Publisher

Remarkable View Ltd

Publication Place

Wellington

Series Title

Whitcombe's practical handbooks

Subject and Association Keywords

Auckland Ferry Building

Subject and Association Keywords

Auckland Ferry Building

Subject and Association Keywords

Marine terminals -- New Zealand -- Auckland

Subject and Association Keywords

Shipping -- New Zealand -- History

Subject and Association Keywords

Architecture -- New Zealand -- Auckland

Subject and Association Keywords

Auckland (NZ) -- Buildings, structures, etc

Subject and Association Keywords

Ferries -- New Zealand -- Auckland -- History

Collection

Thomas & Bridget Gallagher Library

Object Type

Book

ISBN/ISSN

047300688X (pbk.)

Object number

2014.3.0781

Spine Label

725.3 JOH

Copyright Licence  

All rights reserved

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